How Much Does it Cost for Therapy?

My fee for a regular 55-minute first clinical assessment session is $150. Following sessions will range in time between 50-55 minutes, and the fee is $125. Payment is expected and due (in exact cash, personal check or credit/debit card) at the time of service.

Missing Appointments

Missing an appointment without prior cancellation will result in a charge for a full appointment, and will have to be paid at your next appointment. Continuing no- show, non-cancellations will result in a refusal of any future appointments. Referrals to other therapists, however, can be made.

Using Insurance

If you use your insurance, and I am approved as a provider, the dollar amount of your charges for your annual deductible and co-payments are determined by your health insurance company. I am responsible, as are all health care providers under your plan, for collecting a portion of your annual deductible amount until your annual deductible amount is met. After your deductible is met, then your co-payment amount will be collected at each visit. Please ask questions about your fee, either from your health care insurance company, before coming to your first appointment or at the beginning of your initial session or me.

If I am not paneled (do not have a contract with your insurance company) and you choose to use insurance to pay for services, I require you to pay me my fee for services in full. I will provide you with the necessary documents for you to file with your insurance company.

If you choose to use insurance, please consider how your confidentiality may be affected and discuss this with me at our first session. You can read more about this by going to the next section titled

Your insurance company requires that I provide a diagnosis your condition and indicate that you have an illness before they will reimburse you for my services. I will discuss with you the diagnosis I plan to render, if you wish, before you file claims with your insurance company. Any diagnosis made will become a part of a permanent health record that is maintained by, and shared, by health insurance companies.

Your insurance company may handle mental health benefits differently than medical benefits.  I strongly recommend you call your insurance company to ask questions about mental health benefits before you decide to use insurance for psychotherapy.  Recently, insurance companies want me to pre-certify your coverage before I begin seeing you as a patient.  Many insurance plans will only pay for individual psychotherapy, not couple’s or family therapy.  If you are seeing me as a couple or a family I will not tell the insurance company I am doing individual therapy.  If I will be seeing you individually, and you may want to bring your spouse in the future, please let me know of that possibility so that issue is addressed in the precertification process.  As a result, you may be refused reimbursement for treatment.  Most insurance companies require a mental illness diagnosis be made in order to receive payment for therapy.  While I can usually offer a psychotherapeutic opinion that is usually accepted, I am not licensed as a medical practitioner.  This can mean you may be additionally asked to get a diagnosis from a licensed medical physician.

Medicare

Not being a Medicare provider, I cannot receive coverage for you with your Medicare coverage, nor will I be covered by your secondary provider.

No Insurance

My out-of-pocket fee for people without insurance is $125 per hour.  

Seniors Over 65

If you are retired, on a fixed income, and using Medicare as your primary insurance, your out-of-pocket fee will be $90.

 

 

 

Dr. Jim Wayland

Dr. Jim Wayland has been in private practice over 30 years.  His focus is with adults and adult issues.  Jim’s approach to psychotherapy has been nationally recognized for offering positive, can-do results to people who have been struggling with significant life-difficulties, trauma, and emotional discouragement.

Jim uses psychodynamic and behavioral psychology methods to provide effective, efficient lasting results.  He is a Licensed Professional Counselor, a Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor, a Fellow in the Association of Scientific Hypnotherapy, and is certified in Eye-Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR).  Jim uses his education and his experience in helping people suffering from personal crisis, emotional and physical trauma, addiction, stress-related illness, and chronic pain.

Dr. Wayland’s research background has been in Neuropsychology and the Psychophysiology of Hypnosis. He is also experienced in college teaching, public speaking, mentoring and coaching.  He is known nationally and internationally for his work with addictions – alcohol, drugs and sexual addictions.  Jim is a member of the Texas Medical Association’s Speakers Bureau.  He is noted for having a unique ability to connect with others using skills of insight, experience, and finding the truths which circumstances have often hidden.

 

How Do I Find the Right Therapist, Counselor, Psychologist?

Finding the right therapist takes research, patience, and intuition.

When you need and want to find a therapist –-for you, your relationship, and your child-- it is because some part of your life is in turmoil. At those times, the responsibility of finding the right person to help can be overwhelming. There are PhDs, PsyDs, MDs, MSs, MAs and MSWs. They come with different titles and responsibilities. What is the difference among a psychiatrist, psychologist, marriage & family therapist, family counselor, licensed professional counselor, social worker? Who is better prepared for your needs. Who prescribes medications? What are the costs? All these therapists provide mental health services. But each brings different training, experience, insights, and character to the table. It has been said that finding a good therapist is like finding gold bars. A good therapist is non-judging, accepts the patients as they present themselves, and they are tolerant and meet the progress speed of the patient.

Understanding your choices of professional helper:

Psychiatrists: These are doctors who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of mental or psychiatric illnesses. They have medical training and are licensed to prescribe drugs. They are also trained in psychotherapy, or "talk" therapy, which aims to change a person's behaviors or thought patterns.

Psychologists: These are doctoral degree (PhD or PsyD) experts in psychology. They study the human mind and human behavior and are also trained in counseling, psychotherapy, and psychological testing which can help uncover emotional problems you may not realize you have. Cognitive behavioral therapy is the psychologist's main treatment tool to help people identify and change inaccurate perceptions that they may have of themselves and the world around them. Psychologists are not licensed to prescribe medications. However, they can refer you to a psychiatrist if necessary.

Social Workers: These are specialists who usually provide social services in health-related settings. Their goal is to enhance and maintain a person's psychological and social functioning. They provide empathy and counseling on interpersonal problems. Social workers help people function at their best in their environment, and they help people deal with relationships and solve personal and family problems.

Licensed Professional Counselors: These counselors are required by state licensure laws to have at least a master's degree in counseling and 3,000 hours of post-master's experience. They are either licensed or certified to independently diagnose and treat mental and emotional disorders. Counselors can help a wide range of problems, including depression, addiction and substance abuse, suicidal impulses, stress management, self-esteem issues, issues of aging, emotional health, and family, parenting, and marital or other relationship problems. They often work closely with other mental health specialists.

Sorting It Out

When you start your search, keep an open mind. A therapist does not need decades of experience, or a sheepskin from an ivy-league school, to be helpful. Credentials aren't everything. Even people with great credentials aren't necessarily great therapists. They may be smart, but that doesn't mean they have good common sense skill.

Where to Start?

Collect Names.  Don’t start with three names from your managed care company. Very likely, you don't have the company's entire list of provider. Insist on getting the whole provider list. Then ask friends and colleagues if they know a psychologist or psychiatrist who could make recommendations from that list. I am contacted by several people several times every month asking if I can make recommendations even though I am not on their provider’s plan.

Other sources: 

  • Call a university psychiatry or psychology department and ask recommendations of people trained in that program. "At least that way you know they're under scrutiny," says Turner. --If you're moving to a new city, ask your current therapist for referrals, or have him/her check with colleagues. 
  • Check with friends and family. There is no stigma in asking for help.

At the first appointment ask these questions:

  • How long has the therapist been in practice?
  • How many patients have had your problem?
  • What were the results?
  • Ask about policies, fees, payment. But, don't bargain hunt for mental health care because your care is more important than a bargain fee.
  • Do they have a reputation for being professional, credentialed, and competent, with no lawsuits against them?
  • And they must be an intuitive fit. You can't underestimate the value of a good intuitive match with somebody. If you ask them questions about themselves, and they become defensive, go somewhere else."
  • Another important point: Has your therapist been in therapy? It is amazing how many therapists have never undergone personal psychotherapy. How will they accurately help you with your issues if they do not have that experience with their own personal therapist? There is also the risk they may also bring their own issues into your therapy."
  • Ask yourself: • Do I feel reasonably OK with this person? Feeling totally comfortable isn't the best criteria, because if you're too comfortable, you're just chit- chatting, and that doesn't help you. The therapist is a professional with whom you can work and is not to become a friend.
  • Is the therapist really listening to me?
  • Is he or she asking enough questions? Especially in the first sessions, the therapist should be asking many questions, to become acquainted with you and the issues you are dealing with.
  • Has the therapist asked what outcome you want from therapy; how you want your life to be?  How will you know when you reach your objective if neither you nor the therapist has established a goal?
  • Do you feel satisfied with the therapist's resources? For example, outside groups, books, seminars, movies, etc.
  • Has the therapist listened to you and really heard and understood what you need the therapist to know and understand?
  • Does what the therapist say make sense? Does it seem like good, or not-so good, advice? Do you feel it will help you or not? The bottom line is whether you feel your therapist is helpful for you or not.

Dr. Jim Wayland

Dr. Jim Wayland has been in private practice over 30 years.  His focus is with adults and adult issues.  Jim’s approach to psychotherapy has been nationally recognized for offering positive, can-do results to people who have been struggling with significant life-difficulties, trauma, and emotional discouragement.

Jim uses psychodynamic and behavioral psychology methods to provide effective, efficient lasting results.  He is a Licensed Professional Counselor, a Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor, a Fellow in the Association of Scientific Hypnotherapy, and is certified in Eye-Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR).  Jim uses his education and his experience in helping people suffering from personal crisis, emotional and physical trauma, addiction, stress-related illness, and chronic pain.

Dr. Wayland’s research background has been in Neuropsychology and the Psychophysiology of Hypnosis. He is also experienced in college teaching, public speaking, mentoring and coaching.  He is known nationally and internationally for his work with addictions – alcohol, drugs and sexual addictions.  Jim is a member of the Texas Medical Association’s Speakers Bureau.  He is noted for having a unique ability to connect with others using skills of insight, experience, and finding the truths which circumstances have often hidden.

 

Patient Confidentiality: What are the Risks of Using Insurance for Mental Health Therapy?

Click Here for the Downloadable Form

Confidentiality: The Risks Of Using Mental Health
Insurance


Excerpted from Mentor Research Institute http://www.oregoncounseling.org/

Confidentiality is a term that has various legal, administrative, ethical and personal meanings. Confidentiality in health care is not absolute. No matter what assurances you have been given, or what you would assume, your medical and mental health records are not very secure and they are not truly confidential. Keep in mind there are literally hundreds of circumstances in which detailed information regarding your mental health records and personal life can be reviewed, examined and distributed to others as well as be released and even made public. The greatest threat to your confidentiality comes from managed care, insurance and HMOs.

Unfortunately, there are many ways in which supposedly confidential information can end up ruining your future, your life, your reputation and even your health. Here is a brief list that illustrates a few circumstances in which confidential records and information can be breached. Legal exceptions in which reasoned and good faith concerns for personal or public safety allow for a limited release of confidential information. Administrative exceptions in which by contract or prior consent you agree to the release of information in the future as necessary or deemed appropriate by your HMO, health care or insurance company.

Voluntary consent in which you must sign a release in order for treatment to be paid for, authorized or to begin.  Consent as a condition for employment in which your employer has developed background screening criteria from which they can require that you sign a voluntary release as a necessary step in processing your application for employment.

Court order in which a judge orders the release of confidential information as part of your defense in a criminal case or investigation against you. This can occur under unusual and rare circumstances. 

Civil discovery in which you must release information during a civil case in which you are seeking consideration, damages or compensation related to injuries, malpractice & negligence, breach of contract, disability, pain or suffering.

Administrative release of information as a mandatory aspect of a grievance or appeal against your HMO, health care provider or insurance company.


Intentional breach of confidentiality by a managed care company or HMO as a risk management strategy in which the political or economic consequences of maintaining confidentiality are deemed greater than breaching your trust.

Accidental breach of confidentiality in which the responsible source, organization or person is hidden or cannot be identified for purposes of determining fault or responsibility.


Casual breach of confidentiality in which confidential information is overheard, discussed or released during a single or series of unauthorized
informal conversations between peers or friends who work for managed care, your HMO or insurance company.


Employer breach in which a supervisor or manager obtains or comes into possession of mental health information as part of release to return to work following an emergency leave, family leave, injury, illness, relapse, etc...


Absence of legal protections in which an unlicensed counselor or therapist can release information without your permission or release information as part of discovery or demand associated with litigation, investigation or prosecution.


There are three very important questions related to the risk of using health insurance.


1. How do HMOs, managed care and insurance companies get access to confidential information?
2. What information do HMO's, health care and insurance companies demand from your doctor, counselor or psychotherapist?
3. Is the information gathered by HMOs, health care and insurance companies important and necessary?

Almost universally, HMOs, managed health care and insurance companies will require your doctor, psychotherapist or counselor to give you a diagnosis. More importantly, many HMOs, managed health care and insurance companies demand detailed, intimate and private information about your entire life before they authorize payment. It's really simple. In order to get your insurance company to authorize, provide or pay for treatment you must be diagnosed and give a detailed history. Well intended doctors, psychotherapists and counselors routinely gather personal information and give their patient a diagnosis because they can justify the diagnosis and because a patient doesn't want to pay for counseling or treatment. Do you need a diagnosis and is it really necessary to provide a detailed and intimate life history? In rare cases the answer is yes. In virtually every case the answer is no. But the practice is universal.

There are good reasons to be concerned about the use of the current diagnostic system. Please read this article.  In order to get your health insurance to authorize, provide or pay for treatment you must have a diagnosis, you probably need one of the more serious diagnoses and you probably need the kind of diagnosis that is covered by insurance. It is growing practice for doctors, counselors and psychotherapists to give people the more serious diagnosis to qualify them for treatment. 


Why do HMOs, managed health care and insurance companies gather this information? One reason is to ration the amount of service provided and to identify those people with conditions that are not covered. Another reason is to help identify a profile of patients and professionals that can be used to select risk, reduce costs and control not only who receives help and but who is authorized to provide help. The business of healthcare goes to all this bother and expense to make as much money as possible and because they don't trust your doctor or counselor to provide the treatment you are entitled to receive.


The most common breach of confidentiality occurs during civil/legal actions in which you can be forced to release your records during evidence discovery and during trials in which you claim injury, disability, mental or emotional suffering. Such procedures also allow opposing attorneys to interview, take depositions and obtain testimony from your counselor,doctor or psychotherapist.


In reality, the basis for many of these policies and practices that justify a breach of confidentiality are unnecessary, unethical and probably illegal.

What can a person do about it? Getting to the bottom of what actually happened and then being able to correct an injustice can be impossible. It can be an extremely difficult to prove damages and once a breach of confidentiality occurs there is nothing that can be done to undo the damage. At the very least it requires a lot of energy, money and time, as well as a good attorney. The odds are against you even if you are right and even if you have all the resources necessary .

The following are just few examples of literally hundreds of circumstances in which your confidential records and treatment history can be reviewed, made public or obtained. If you are in the military, there is very little that can be considered confidential from the military. In the private sector, there are more distinct boundaries between healthcare providers and your employer, but even those can become blurred. In the private sector there are cases in which you can be formally excluded during a job application if you refuses to sign a release to investigate your background.


The line between employers and healthcare companies are increasingly blurred. For example, many HMO's and managed care companies are both the employer and the health care provider for their employees. Employees must trust that their supervisors, managers and administrators will police themselves and follow their own policies. Imagine being a psychiatrist on staff in a hospital that you work for where your patient is a nurse who also works in your hospital. Imagine that this psychiatrist in also an administrator and that he or she discovers that the nurse is breaking hospital policy to protect patients, Normally he would not be allowed by law to take actions to have her suspended because the relationship is confidential. The conflict of interest here is huge and the informal mechanisms of sharing information can be astonishing. Your employer and managed healthcare company increasingly work together to cut costs. As insurance companies increasingly centralize their records, they provide access to multiple sources that are not policed by any external agency and are essentially on their good behavior to not misuse their access to your records.


The Medical Information Bureau, Inc., in Cambridge, Massachusetts, maintains a nationwide database of health care claims and makes information available to interested parties. Insurers have been known to withhold life insurance from people with certain diagnoses and to withhold health and disability insurance from people who have submitted mental health claims to another insurer. Other interested parties may access this data as part of legal proceedings, investigations, evaluations or actions in which you are required to sign a release. Supervisors, human resource managers, employee assistance counselors, recruitment specialists and employment screening investigators who work for employers can in some cases obtain access to these records and are expected to voluntarily police themselves and ignore information that would discriminate against you.

Employers can find out more about your health care history in other ways. In some cases you can be compelled by a prospective employer to sign a release authorizing them or their agent to have access to your mental health records. They can ask you if you have any condition or problem and imply that they merely want to be sure you receive protection that you are entitled to under the law.

For example, Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 provides some federal protection for citizens who are disabled by psychological or physical problems. However,the ADA applies primarily to large employers, is difficult to enforce and many psychological problems are not covered. Employers are looking for information that they feel is essential to select the best person for a job. At best, people may be protected somewhat from the most obvious and gross acts of discrimination. 

/Source

Dr. Jim Wayland

Dr. Jim Wayland has been in private practice over 30 years.  His focus is with adults and adult issues.  Jim’s approach to psychotherapy has been nationally recognized for offering positive, can-do results to people who have been struggling with significant life-difficulties, trauma, and emotional discouragement.

Jim uses psychodynamic and behavioral psychology methods to provide effective, efficient lasting results.  He is a Licensed Professional Counselor, a Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor, a Fellow in the Association of Scientific Hypnotherapy, and is certified in Eye-Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR).  Jim uses his education and his experience in helping people suffering from personal crisis, emotional and physical trauma, addiction, stress-related illness, and chronic pain.

Dr. Wayland’s research background has been in Neuropsychology and the Psychophysiology of Hypnosis. He is also experienced in college teaching, public speaking, mentoring and coaching.  He is known nationally and internationally for his work with addictions – alcohol, drugs and sexual addictions.  Jim is a member of the Texas Medical Association’s Speakers Bureau.  He is noted for having a unique ability to connect with others using skills of insight, experience, and finding the truths which circumstances have often hidden.

 

What are my Legal Matters Rights and What are Your Fees?

Please be notified:

  • I am not a legal consultant or representative.
  • I do not do custody evaluations or make recommendations regarding custody agreements.
  • I do provide counseling, consultation, and psychotherapy to individuals and couples who are ending marriages or ending relationships.
  • If I am called to testify through a deposition or ordered to court, I only offer objective opinion--opinion that is unbiased without conjecture.
  • Because I am mandated to protect the confidentiality of all my clients and their children, I shall not testify nor provide summary of sessions for the purpose of custody issues.
  • I shall not discuss the content of any session with any legal representative.
  • If, however, I am subpoenaed to or ordered to do so by a seated, presiding judge, the fee to the party demanding such services will be $2400.00 for any part of, and up to, a full eight-hour day for counseling/consulting testimony.
  • A two-day retainer must be paid up front.
  • Lodging and travel expenses will be charged additionally for all activity related to and providing such a service(s) and an additional $500 per day must also be paid up front. 

Dr. Jim Wayland

Dr. Jim Wayland has been in private practice over 30 years.  His focus is with adults and adult issues.  Jim’s approach to psychotherapy has been nationally recognized for offering positive, can-do results to people who have been struggling with significant life-difficulties, trauma, and emotional discouragement.

Jim uses psychodynamic and behavioral psychology methods to provide effective, efficient lasting results.  He is a Licensed Professional Counselor, a Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor, a Fellow in the Association of Scientific Hypnotherapy, and is certified in Eye-Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR).  Jim uses his education and his experience in helping people suffering from personal crisis, emotional and physical trauma, addiction, stress-related illness, and chronic pain.

Dr. Wayland’s research background has been in Neuropsychology and the Psychophysiology of Hypnosis. He is also experienced in college teaching, public speaking, mentoring and coaching.  He is known nationally and internationally for his work with addictions – alcohol, drugs and sexual addictions.  Jim is a member of the Texas Medical Association’s Speakers Bureau.  He is noted for having a unique ability to connect with others using skills of insight, experience, and finding the truths which circumstances have often hidden.

 

What is HIPAA?

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 (P.L.104-191) [HIPAA]


The purpose of this document is to describe how health information about you may be used and disclosed and how you can get access to this information.

PLEASE REVIEW NOTICE CAREFULLY

If you have questions about this notice, feel free to ask for clarification about anything that you do not understand.


RECORDS


Each time you are seen in therapy a record of your visit is made. Typically the record contains your complaints, assessments, symptoms, evaluations, risk related issues, diagnoses, interventions, plans for future sessions, and billing-related information.

OUR RESPONSIBILITY

We are required by law to maintain the privacy of your health information and to provide you a description of our privacy practices. Your privacy is important to us and we take our obligation to protect your privacy very seriously.


USES AND DISCLOSURES:

We make every effort to provide information to only those individuals with a demonstrated need to know. Here are some examples of how we use and disclose your health information.


For treatment--we use your health information to provide you treatment or other services. Therefore, we may disclose your health information to:

Your physician or other healthcare provider:
Anyone on our staff involved in your treatment. Any one required by federal, state, or local laws to have access to your treatment record.

For Payment:
We may use and disclose health information, your treatment, and services to bill and collect payment from you, your insurance company (see confidentiality precautions in using health insurance), or a third party payer.

For Quality Assurance and Office Operations:

  • We may use or disclose your health information to members of our staff and/or a peer consultation group. 
  • We may use your health information to assess the care and outcomes in your case and others like it. The results will then be used to continually improve the quality of care for patients we serve. We will remove information that identifies you from this set of health information to protect your privacy. 
  • We may use or disclose your health information to evaluate the effectiveness of our staff, supervise our staff, improve quality of our services, meet accreditation standards and in connection with licensing, credentialing, or certification activities.

Other Examples:

  • To leave a message for you on your answering machine/VM for scheduling and billing purposes
  • To assess your satisfaction with our services
  • To make you aware of new services
  • To business associates we have contracted with to perform agreed upon services and billing for it
  • To anyone you give us written authorization to have your health information, for the reason you want. You may revoke this authorization in writing at any time. When you revoke an authorization it will only affect your health information from that point on to a family member, a person responsible for your care, or your personal representative in the event of an emergency
  • If you are present in such a case, we will give you an opportunity to object.
  • In an emergency, if you object, are not present, or are incapable of responding, we may use our professional judgment and use or disclose your health information to advance your best interest.

Business Associates:
There are some services provided by this office through contracts with business associates (for example, computer technician, accountant, clinical billing personnel, marketing consultant, etc. When these services are contracted, we may disclose your health information to our business associate so that they may perform the job we have asked them to do. To protect your health information, however, we require the business associates to appropriately safeguard your information.

Individuals Involved in your Care of Payment for Your Care:

We may release health information about you to a designated friend or family member who is involved in your clinical care or who helps to pay for your care. 

Future Communications:
We may communicate with you via newsletters, email, mail outs, or other means regarding treatment options, follow-up on status of your complaint, groups, seminars, community-based initiatives or activities which our Institute is participating.

Law Enforcement/Legal Proceedings:
We may disclose health information for law enforcement purposes (e.g., to prevent suicide or homicide) and in response to a valid subpoena signed by a judge.

WAYS YOUR INFORMATION WILL NOT BE USED


We will not use the details of your health information in any of the Office marketing, development, public relations, or related activities without your written authorization. Composite case descriptions with fictitious names will be referenced in some of these endeavors without prior authorization.

YOUR HEALTH INFORMATION RIGHTS

Your health record is the physical property of the office that compiled it, you have the right to:

Inspect and Copy:
You have the right to inspect and obtain a copy of the health information that may be used to make decisions about your care. Usually, this includes clinical and billing records. We may deny your request to inspect and copy in certain very limited circumstances. We will charge you a reasonable fee for making photocopies.

Amend:
If you feel that health information we have about you is incorrect or incomplete, you may ask us in writing to amend the information, you have the right to request an amendment for as long as your record is kept by or for the Institute. We may deny your request for an amendment and if this occurs, you will be given the reason for denial. If we deny your amendment,
you can place a written statement in our records disagreeing with our denial of your request. If your written amendment is approved, we will change our records accordingly. We will also notify anyone else who may have received the original information and anyone for whom you give us written permission.

An Accounting of Disclosures:
You have the right to request an accounting of disclosures. This is a list of certain disclosures we make of our health information for the purpose other than treatment, payment, or healthcare operations where an authorization was not required. This can be backdated six years. This information is not available for records prior to April 14, 2003. If you request this information more than once in a 12 month period we may charge a fee based on the time it takes to tabulate these disclosures.

Request Restrictions:
You have the right to request a restriction or limitation on the health information we use or disclose about you for treatment, payment, or healthcare operations. You also have the right to request a limit on the health information we disclose about you to someone who is involved in your care or the payment for your care. We are not required to agree to your request. If we do agree, we will comply with your request unless the information is needed in order to provide emergency treatment.


Request Confidential Communications:
You have the right to request that we communicate with you about clinical matters in a certain way or at a certain location. For example, you may ask that we contact you at work instead of your home or by U.S. Mail. The office will grant reasonable written requests for confidential communications at alternative locations and/or via alternative means only if the request is submitted in writing. The written request must include a mailing address where the individual will receive bills for and correspondences about services rendered by the Institute.


A Paper Copy of this Notice:
You have the right to a paper copy of this notice. You may ask us to give you a copy of this notice at any time. You are still entitled to a paper copy of this notice even if you have agreed to receive this notice electronically.


CHANGES TO THE NOTICE


We reserve the right to change this notice and the revised or changed notice will be effective for information we already have about you as well as any information we receive in the future. The current notice will be posted at the Institute. The effective date of this notice is April 14, 2003 and it will be in effect until it is replaced.


COMPLAINTS


If you believe your privacy rights have been violated or disagree with a decision we have made about any of your rights in this notice, please feel free to discuss it further with your behavioral health provider to arrive at a satisfactory outcome. You may also file a complaint with the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. All complaints must be submitted in writing. You will not be penalized for filing a complaint.

Dr. Jim Wayland

Dr. Jim Wayland has been in private practice over 30 years.  His focus is with adults and adult issues.  Jim’s approach to psychotherapy has been nationally recognized for offering positive, can-do results to people who have been struggling with significant life-difficulties, trauma, and emotional discouragement.

Jim uses psychodynamic and behavioral psychology methods to provide effective, efficient lasting results.  He is a Licensed Professional Counselor, a Licensed Chemical Dependency Counselor, a Fellow in the Association of Scientific Hypnotherapy, and is certified in Eye-Movement Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR).  Jim uses his education and his experience in helping people suffering from personal crisis, emotional and physical trauma, addiction, stress-related illness, and chronic pain.

Dr. Wayland’s research background has been in Neuropsychology and the Psychophysiology of Hypnosis. He is also experienced in college teaching, public speaking, mentoring and coaching.  He is known nationally and internationally for his work with addictions – alcohol, drugs and sexual addictions.  Jim is a member of the Texas Medical Association’s Speakers Bureau.  He is noted for having a unique ability to connect with others using skills of insight, experience, and finding the truths which circumstances have often hidden.